Dec 182018
 
VID Celebrated a Progressive 2019

VID Celebrated a Progressive 2019.  And the Elation Was Tangible. For 2018 VID Celebrated a 2019 on December 9th thanks to our venerable host, Frieda Bradlow and Son, Robert Bradlow.  The highlight was a visit by Congresssman Jerrold Nadler, soon to be Chair of the House Judiciary Committee, who, in spite of an intensive media schedule, chose to share candid insights with his loyal VID constituency.  Among other notables intent on the VID celebration were:   Congresswoman Carolyn Maloney, NYS Senator Brad Hoylman, NYS Assemblymember Deborah Glick, Council Speaker Corey Johnson, Councilmember Brad Lander, Councilmember Mark Levine, Judge Frank Nervo, Judge Carol Feinman, Judge Melissa Crane, Judge Wendy Li, Judge Alexander Tisch, Judge Jennifer Schecter, Judge Louis Nock, Judge Grace Park, Susan Dess, Judicial Candidate, Kim Parker, Judicial Candidate.  Executive and members from other NYC political clubs were also in attendance:  Allen Roskoff, President Jim Owles Liberal Democratic Club; Michael Schreiber, Past President Chelsea Reform Democratic Club; Jeanne Wilcke, past President Downtown Independent Democrats.  The conversations were […]

Jan 052017
 
VID Lauds Governor Cuomo for Granting Clemencies

VID praises New York State Governor Andrew Cuomo for his end-of-the year decision granting clemencies to more than 100 people.  These included pardons for many youthful offenders convicted of minor crimes, and the commutation of sentences for several elderly prisoners, including Judith Clark. The Governor’s decision was the culmination of years of effort for VID.  New York’s venerable progressive club is a major sponsor of Candles for Clemency, which since 2009 has led a campaign for criminal justice reform.  Prior to last week, clemencies had not been a priority for the Governor.  Club members were among the organizers and participants in the movement to inspire the Governor to recognize the plight of prisoners. “We are proud of the role VID played in making this day possible,” said Tony Hoffmann, co-chair of Candles for Clemency and a former President of Village Independent Democrats.  “We have been and will continue to be […]

Sep 272015
 

Candles for Clemency from emmanuel fineus on Vimeo. More than 150 Candles for Clemency Lit Up Mt. Kisco on Sept 26th In a departure from his previous policy, Governor Andrew Cuomo is establishing a system to review requests to shorten prison sentences of rehabilitated prisoners. Four days before a planned demonstration near his Westchester County home that had the backing of a wide array of elected officials, the governor called longtime gay activist Allen Roskoff, saying, “I get it. I get it. It will be done.” Cuomo pledged to review requests for clemency from state prisoners. The September 26 demonstration in the parking lot of the Presbyterian Church of Mount Kisco was the second annual “Candles for Clemency” gathering demanding that “Governor Cuomo get a heart; issue clemencies now.”  Nathan Riley, Gay City News, Sept. 27 Cuomo chief counsel, Alphonso David, addressed the demonstrators and described the new review plan: “Particular […]

Sep 092015
 
Candles for Clemency - Second Rally Sept 26

RALLY FOR PRISON JUSTICE  AT HOME OF GOVERNOR CUOMO   To protest Governor Andrew Cuomo’s cruel and unjust prison policies, elected officials, celebrities, religious leaders, and other people of conscience will gather for a candlelight vigil to respectfully insist that New York State demonstrate wisdom, mercy, and righteousness. The rally and vigil will take place at the intersection of Crow Hill Rd. and Millwood Rd., in Mount Kisco, on Saturday, September 26 at 7 p.m. Buses will leave New York City from 10th Avenue, (btw 16th and 17th Sts.) at 5 p.m. Mount Kisco is also accessible by car and Metro North railroad. New York State prison policies are in desperate need of reform. Many people are unjustly incarcerated, given unreasonably long sentences and have been placed in solitary confinement. Prisons hold many elderly, ill and disabled people who have served excessive time, pose no threat to society, and can live productive […]